Monster Hunter Siege by Larry Correia: Review

Monster Hunter Siege is a satisfying new entry in the popular series. However, it also demonstrates Larry Correia’s unwillingness to take writing risks.

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins: Review

The Library at Mount Char is a well-written fantasy novel which aches with the potential for greatness but doesn't quite achieve it.

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel: Review

Sleeping Giants is a highly enjoyable and accessible novel which builds a human story around the impact of a piece of alien technology found on Earth.

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee: Review

Ninefox Gambit is an enjoyable and polished piece of military science fiction goodness, which has only a few small flaws that let it down.

Son of the Black Sword by Larry Correia: Review

Son of the Black Sword is a fast-moving and gutsy epic fantasy novel which contains a great deal of the gritty prose which Larry Correia is known for.

Firefight by Brandon Sanderson: Review

If you liked Steelheart, I recommend you pick up Firefight. It won’t take you long to read it, and it’s an ideal light read after a heavier series.

Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Sword: Review

Ancillary Sword is a worthy follow-up to Ann Leckie’s Hugo- and Nebula-Award-winning debut, Ancillary Justice.

The Fractal Prince by Hannu Rajaniemi: Review

If you liked The Quantum Thief, you should be reading this excellent follow-up by author Hannu Rajaniemi.

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson: Review

Brandon Sanderson’s Steelheart novel is a quality novel that most science fiction/fantasy fans will enjoy -- as long as they don't take it too seriously.

The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss: Review

Patrick Rothfuss’s novella The Slow Regard of Silent Things is an extremely charming extended vignette that any Rothfuss fan would be a true fool to miss.

Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice: Review

Ann Leckie’s debut Ancillary Justice, is a stellar modern piece of science fiction which will remind seasoned readers of the classic greats in the genre.

Fool’s Assassin by Robin Hobb: Review

Fool's Assassin is a triumphant return to the world and the characters which Robin Hobb commenced two decades ago with Assassin's Apprentice.

The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss: Review

With The Wise Man’s Fear, Patrick Rothfuss has produced what his fans have been praying for: A sequel worthy to the Name of the Wind.

The Player of Games by Iain M. Banks: Review

One of Iain M. Banks' tightest Culture novels, The Player of Games represents the British author writing science fiction at his most accessible.

Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks: Review

Read 24 years after it was first published in 1987, it is apparent that Consider Phlebas is what might be termed a flawed gem of modern science fiction.

The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi: Review

The Quantum Thief is that rarest of rare birds; a first novel by a debut author which is a joy to read and takes the science fiction genre forward.

Towers of Midnight by Brandon Sanderson and Robert Jordan: Review

Disappointingly, Towers of Midnight will go down in history as one of the poorest books in the awe-inspiring The Wheel of Time series.

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson: Review

The Stormlight Archive is a series that every fantasy fan should read and be familiar with. The Way of Kings represents a stellar start to that series.

Dragon Haven by Robin Hobb: Review

With Dragon Haven, fantasy master Robin Hobb began to rekindle some of the magic that had left her most recent works.

Gardens of the Moon by Steven Erikson: Review

Gardens of the Moon is a remarkable book and a must-read for the more advanced fantasy fans amongst us. But it's a flawed novel.

The Gathering Storm by Brandon Sanderson and Robert Jordan: Review

Considering that Robert Jordan is no longer around, it is remarkable that The Gathering Storm is so true to the vision of the series' original creator.

Hyperion by Dan Simmons: Review

Dan Simmons' 1989 book Hyperion is a masterpiece of the science fiction genre and a must-read for any lover of classic sci-fi literature.

Transition by Iain Banks: Review

Transition is not for everyone. But for those who are willing to push through Banks' sardonic veil to see what's beyond, you'll find a fascinating journey.

The Darkest Road by Guy Gavriel Kay: Review

The Darkest Road represents a satisfying conclusion to Guy Gavriel Kay's debut fantasy series, The Fionavar Tapestry.

The Wandering Fire by Guy Gavriel Kay: Review

The Wandering Fire is a worthy and satisfying follow-up to Guy Gavriel Kay's first book in The Fionavar Tapestry trilogy, The Summer Tree.

Brandon Sanderson’s The Hero of Ages: Review

The Hero of Ages is the best possible conclusion to what has become one of modern fantasy's best trilogies, the Mistborn series.

The Well of Ascension by Brandon Sanderson: Review

If you liked the first Mistborn novel, you'll want to pick up The Well of Ascension and block out a sizeable chunk of space in your diary.

The Summer Tree by Guy Gavriel Kay: Review

The Summer Tree, the first book by Guy Gavriel Kay, is a delightful little gem of fantasy literature that promises big things for the author.

Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson: Review

Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn: The Final Empire is a thoroughly satisfying beginning to what I expect will be a great trilogy.

A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller: Review

A Canticle for Leibowitz represents a hilarious, disturbing and enlightening vision of our young race and will remain a landmark in the sci-fi genre.

Use of Weapons by Iain M. Banks: Review

Use of Weapons is a thought-provoking, if flawed, meditation on the use of violence as a tool for political and societal development.

Best Served Cold by Joe Abercrombie: Review

Joe Abercrombie's new stand-alone novel Best Served Cold is a blood-soaked revenge quest that will highly satisfy fantasy fans with a black sense of humour.